Posted on August 03, 2017 by Kim Mead

We have all heard the benefits of consuming water, water can have countless effects on our body and mind. Water can affect our ability to focus, our body’s ability to exercise, the way in which our complexion looks and the way we feel in the day (these are just some examples!).

Now it is summer, it is especially important to stay hydrated during the hot weather as we tend to suffer more fluid loss from sweat. Here are a few handy tips to help you stay hydrated in summer.

We don’t have to drink it all in one go!

You don’t need to drink 2-2.5l of water all in one go – you can gain some fluid from the fruits and the rest can be achieved from around 8 x 250ml glasses throughout the day.

Put your water in the freezer before a workout

Research suggests that colder water is more beneficial for you compared to room temperature during exercise because it lowers your core temperature. In a British cycling study, they found that cyclists who consumed colder water were able to cycle significantly longer compared to the group that consumed warm water.

Pinch yourself!

Treat it like a rule of thumb. Using the index finger and the thumb, pinch the back of your hand. If the skin takes a while to return back into its original position then you may be dehydrated.

Fruits & Vegetables

This may be a tip that not everyone is aware of – it is important to get fruits and vegetables into your diet because it is known that their impact on hydration is an extremely positive one. Fruit and veg also contain a high amount of electrolytes which are a key component to maintaining hydration.

Monitor your urine

This can be seen as a way of checking the maintenance of hydration – you know you are hydrated when your urine is a pale yellow colour; anything darker than this may mean you are dehydrated and should look to increase water intake.

Dickens Yard Spa Team

References:
Dolgoff, S. (2017) – https://www.fitnessmagazine.com/recipes/drink/hydration-tips/
McDermott, N. (2015) https://greatist.com/fitness/hydration-during-exercise
Tallmadge, K. (2013) https://www.livescience.com/38553-staying-hydrated-in-the-heat.html